fuji x h1 review 2019

fuji x h1 review 2019

The first X-series camera with in-body image stabilization, it offers several major upgrades from the X-T2, including more extensive video options, flicker reduction mode, electronic shutter, improved AF performance, and a higher-resolution EVF. The X-H1 also inherits the customizable continuous AF profiles introduced on the X-T2. Of the lenses with OIS, the XF 18-135mm, XF 80mm Macro, XF 50-140mm and XF 100-400mm should all enjoy up to five stops of compensation. Once connected, the app offered the same four options as previous versions: Remote Control, Receive, Browse Camera and Geotagging. I did occasionally experience the five stops quoted by Fujifilm, but not consistently. There’s also face detection with optional eye detection. Now it’s no longer an issue on the X-H1 and it really does breath a new lease of life into their unstabilised lenses. This top row of buttons are also slightly larger and more rounded than on the X-T2, making them easier to press especially with gloves. Circling the base of the ISO dial is another ring control, this time dedicated to the drive mode with options for Movie, Bracketing, Continuous High, Continuous Medium, Continuous Low, Single frame, Advanced Filter (effects), and Panorama. The Fujifilm X-H1 looks like a chunkier version of the X-T2 with some aspects of the medium format GFX-50S thrown into the mix; indeed if the X-T2 and GFX got together, the X-H1 could be their offspring. The one function that sets the Fujifilm X-H1 apart from all other cameras in the X series range is the addition of In Body Image Stabilisation (IBIS), which allows up to 5.5 stops of stabilization. This is a frustrating limitation inherited from earlier models and something that really should be fixed by now. To put it through its paces, I used Eterna on all the video samples you’ll find in this review, unless otherwise stated. The display is also highly visible in any conditions whether backlit on a white background, or reversed with white text on a dark background. Finally! To be fair though, on Sony’s A7 III I found its Slot-2 was half the speed of Slot-1 when using UHS-II cards, so at least the X-H1 suffers nowhere near that fall in performance. Jean Pascal October 15, 2019 Roxham Road, Independent journalism quebec, enter … Meanwhile the Multiple Exposure option lets you take two shots and have the camera combine them into one. The shutter! The battery life too is noticeably shorter than the best of the rest, again demanding that you shoot with the optional battery grip more often than not. I repeated the test several times with the same result. You can customize the function of most of the buttons, including the exposure compensation, AE-L, AF-ON and cross keys, as well as choosing what happens when you swipe the screen in one of four directions; the rear dial is also customizable, although weirdly, the front dial is not. Meanwhile the electronic viewfinder now employs a higher resolution 3.69 million dot OLED panel with 0.75x magnification. When I first encountered this panel on the GFX-50S, I wasn’t 100% convinced, but over time I’ve grown to find it very useful and while it means the X-H1 departs from its purely retro styling, it is simply very useful. Fujifilm reckons the battery is good for about 310 frames, but enable the built-in image stabilisation, deploy the wireless connectivity or start shooting movies and you’ll find the power depleting quite alarmingly. If you enable this, the app proudly states it’ll provide and embed location details for the next 60 minutes, but what it doesn’t tell you is it’ll be the same position for every single picture you take over the next hour, even if you move to a different location. Meanwhile the performance of the X-Trans III sensor is well-known, delivering clean images with long exposures even when noise reduction is disabled; here’s an example where I dialled-in a four minute exposure using a 10-stop ND filter from Lee. Here’s how the coverage looks when mounted on an X-series body. So if you’re experiencing wireless issues, I’d stick with a USB cable instead. In terms of battery life and overheating, I recorded consecutive 15 minute clips in 4k UHD / 24p at 200Mbit/s with stabilisation enabled using a fully charged battery in a cool room. The battery life isn’t very great, but for $1000 USD, Fuji includes the battery grip with 2 extra batteries. 200 ISO with Lee Big Stopper. That said, there is a Bulb mode if you want to deploy exposures as long as 60 minutes using a cable release, but most photographers won’t need to as it’s possible to manually select exposures of 30, 40, 50 or 60 seconds, or two, four, eight of 15 minutes using the T mode and rear dial. You can import JPEGs at either 3 Megapixels or the original size, but again not RAW files. I’ll get write more about the X-H1 as I go travel the world this winter… I’ll get back to you guys!Cheers, Roxham Road, Independent journalism quebec, enter canada illegally, migrant roxham road. I feel this is a missed opportunity as being able to recharge all three batteries unattended with a single power source would be so much easier at the end of a day. Above: 240 second exposure with X-H1 and XF 10-24mm. The X-H1 inherits the standard nine simulations of earlier X-Trans III bodies, and debuts a tenth: Eterna which is designed to deliver a cinematic style to video without post processing. The only issue I faced was when shooting with a zoned area, the X-H1 sometimes focused on his body rather than his face, resulting in some shots being a tad soft, but the fast bursts meant I had plenty of frames to choose from. There's a new leader in Fuji X series performance. Like other bodies employing the X-Trans III sensor, the X-H1’s phase-detect system embeds 169 autofocus points within a 13×13 square area on the frame – occupying roughly 75% of the height and 50% of the width. It also makes them much more usable for handheld video, more of which in a moment. My views are biased as hell! This in turn could explain the differences in compensation between lenses – perhaps the system deliberately reigns itself in when the imaging circle on a certain model is tight with little breathing space beyond. The aperture is sufficiently large for some separation from the background, especially when focused at close range. New to the X-H1 is an electronic front curtain mode which uses an electronic shutter to start the exposure and a mechanical one to end it; this can help reduce the risk of shutter shock, although I never experienced any with the X-H1, so I stuck with either the fully mechanical shutter or the electronic one when I needed silence or the fastest burst shooting or quicker shutter. Summary The Fujifilm X-H1 is the new flagship in the mirrorless X-series. Throughout my tests with unstabilised lenses on the X-H1, I experienced similar results: typically a reliable three stops of compensation, or in some instances a little more. Older: X-T3 X-T2 X-T20 X-Pro2 X-T100 . Meanwhile the X-H1’s stabilisation may work a treat when you’re trying to frame a steady shot, but once you start to pan even slowly, the system becomes visibly jerky, whereas more mature rivals can support smoother handheld pans. Ken Rockwell compares the shutter sound of the Fuji X-H1 to the Nikon F6, and I believe that he’s right. 100% crops with IBIS off (left) and IBIS enabled (right). The weather-sealed body is Fuji’s toughest yet in the series with a shell employing magnesium that’s 25% thicker than the X-T2, and a harder, more scratch-resistant surface coating. There’s still no in-camera HDR generation, but certainly enough bracketing to keep HDR enthusiasts satisfied. By sharing the same sensor as the X-T2, the core capabilities are the same, although Fujifilm has enhanced a number of aspects. The 100-400 lens performed very well and sharpness is impressive. Even more impressive, you can dial-in up to 3EV increments regardless of the number of frames, allowing you to achieve a +/-12EV maximum range if desired (nine frames at 3EV increments). It’s a beautiful piece engineering and it does make me want to hold it just for the sake of it. Like the X-T2, the X-H1 employs a 0.5in OLED panel for its electronic viewfinder and while the quoted magnification has fallen fractionally from 0.77x to 0.75x (a difference that’s not visible in real life), the panel resolution has been boosted from 2.36 to 3.69 million dots – that’s an upgrade from 1024×768 pixels to 1280×960 pixels. I’ll be adding a page with detailed analysis over the performance throughout the sensitivity range, but for now, please head over to my sample images page which features a broad selection of pictures taken with a variety of lenses. Some of them, particularly the primes, can be fairly leisurely to focus, while others, typically the sporty zooms with Linear Motors (LM on the model name), snap into focus much faster. The X-H1 also inherits the 3in screen of the X-T2 which supports vertical and horizontal tilting, albeit still unable to face forward to the subject for selfies or filming pieces to camera; on the plus side it’s now touch-sensitive, allowing you to tap to reposition the AF area, pull-focus while filming, as well as swiping through various options. Compare that to the X-T2 at 133x92x49mm (35.4mm at its thinnest point) and a weight of 507g including battery, and it’s clear the X-H1 is comfortably larger in every dimension, especially the thickness; indeed it begins to approach the GFX body in this regard. The X-H1 additionally offers a Cinema 4k / 17:9 format, again at up to 200Mbit/s, although only at 23.976 and 24p frame rates. It’s that good. Ok, that’s the theory, how about the experience in practice? Tapping your way through these nested menus can take time, but does allow you to make adjustments without visible clicks and also neatly allows you to maintain very different settings for photos and video without constantly having to readjust things like the shutter speed. There’s four options on the X-H1: Spot (2% of the total are in the centre), Center-weighted, Multi and Average. The unusual screen mechanism may be quick to use, but still can’t flip forward to face the subject for selfies or filming pieces to camera, and I also found the substantial viewfinder eye cup blocked a large portion of the view when the screen was angled-up. As of September 2019, oddly you can get the X-H1 with the VPB-XH1 Vertical Power Gripas a kit (camera & grip weigh 34.3 oz./972g with card and one battery) at a deep package discount for less … It’s a feature Fujifilm debuted on the X-E3 and as a long exposure photographer I absolutely love it. GFX 100 GFX 50R G-Mount Lenses. Sample Images Intro Grip Specs Performance Compared User's Guide Recommendations More Fujifilm X-H1 (23.8 oz./674g with battery and card, $999 new or about $850 used if you know How to Win at eBay) and Fujifilm 16mm f/2.8. In use the X-H1’s mechanical shutter really is one of the quietest around with just the faintest click that’s virtually inaudible if there’s any ambient noise. Here are the top 3 reasons why I bought the #Fujifilm X-H1 back as my main photo camera. The effect above reminds me of earlier stabilised systems on rivals before gradual refinement began to better understand the differences between unwanted wobble and deliberate movement. If the subject is fairly predictable, like an approaching cyclist on a track, the X-H1 has no problems at all, even at 400mm (600mm equivalent). The 24mm equivalent field of view is an eternal favourite with landscape and architectural photographers, capturing wider and more dynamic compositions than a 28mm, but without the distortion of an ultra-wide. In a departure for Fujifilm’s X-series bodies, the shutter release has been shifted forward onto the grip and is no longer threaded for a retro-style cable release. After the third 15 minute clip, the base and grip were warmer, but again nothing to be concerned about, and now the battery meter showed two bars remaining. I also felt the Olympus OMD EM1 Mark II felt more confident with birds in flight than the X-H1, and both it and the Lumix G9 can shoot even faster bursts while additionally boasting various pre-capture modes that can buffer a few frames before you fully push down on the shutter, ensuring you never miss the moment. These lenses are actually pretty close matches when the respective sensor’s behind them are taken into consideration: both start at 24mm equivalent, both deliver the same equivalent depth-of-field across the 24-83mm range, although the Sony extends a little further to 105mm. Add the XF 16-55mm f2.8 to the X-H1 and the total length (including eyecup) measures 165mm and the combined weight becomes 1328g. It’s also worth remembering that while the Lumix G9 has a smaller sensor, its stabilisation is even better still, the screen can flip forward for filming pieces to camera, and there’s the option of filming 4k up to 60p; the GH5(s) adds unlimited recording times and 10-bit internal recording. No need to do anything other than make the initial pairing before then leaving the app running on the phone. Sometimes it would detect a face, but at other times just lose it. Set the lens to A, but turn the shutter speed dial and you’ll be in Shutter Priority. It can be fun to have it playing in the background as you go through this page…. Note this is just for indication, not control – you’ll still need to change settings on the camera and use the camera’s shutter release to take the shot. Lenses with OIS use their two optical axes for pitch and yaw, leaving the remaining three (X shift, Y shift and roll) to the body; the exception here is the recent XF 80mm macro which sports four axes of optical stabilisation and only utilities the single roll compensation from the X-H1 body. The magnesium alloy shell is also 25% thicker than the X-T2, making it twice as strong overall, and the surface coating is more scratch-resistant too. Considering these resolve essentially my only complaints about the XT2, it looks set to be one of the most satisfying cameras this year, although possibly the last to use the X-Trans III sensor. The larger body is to accommodate the built-in stabilisation and more substantial heatsink to keep the sensor cool, especially when filming video at the higher bit rates, but obviously the additional heft will be welcomed by anyone with larger hands or those who’ll more regularly shoot with Fujifilm’s bigger lenses. As a camera aimed at experienced photographers though, the X-H1 lacks the full Auto mode switch of recent lower-end models. In particular, this was one of my major bugbears with the XF 16-55mm and XF 90mm, both superb lenses, but both models that I struggled to handhold as accurately as I wanted for prevision framing. And again while the face and eye detection can work well in some situations, I found them sufficiently inconsistent that I was wary to use them outside of controlled posed situations. (including batteries) which makes it is the bulkiest camera in the X Series. The overall look is more modern than many of the X-series bodies which preceded it and you may or may not like this direction in design. Despite being paired, the app asked me to manually select ‘Wireless Communications’ from the X-H1’s menus and also manually enable the phone’s own Wifi before it would connect them. Fujifilm may offer focus peaking but there’s no zebra patterns for judging exposure. Above: Fujifilm X-H1 and XF 90mm at 1/5. To measure the X-H1’s burst speeds and buffer depth in a more formal environment, I timed a number of bursts using a freshly-formatted UHS-II card, initially in Slot 1. You can also set a delay up to 24 hours before the sequence begins, although the camera still won’t assemble them into a timelapse video afterwards, something Canon, Olympus and Panasonic now offer as standard, sometimes even at 4k resolutions. I used my 80-400 on the D500 and Had my 300 f2.8 + TC1.4 on my D5. There’s no headphone jack either unless again you’re using the optional grip. Above left: Fujifilm XH1, above right: Fujifilm GFX. Simply the best Fuji ever made. In terms of weight the X-H1’s body (including battery) tips the scale at 693g. An option to Receive may seem redundant when you have various thumbnail views for importing on the app, but it’s actually very useful. With the card inserted in Slot-1, a burst of 28 uncompressed RAW files took 7.47 seconds to finish writing to the card. If you fancy more reach, there’s the Leica 12-60mm f2.8-4, which with the G9 weighs 978g. Like earlier models, the X-H1 also considerately displays a timer on-screen during long exposures, either counting-up in Bulb mode, or down from a selected shutter speed. If you’re shooting with continuous autofocus, the X-H1 exclusively uses this AF system and area, but if you switch to single autofocus, the coverage expands widthways using a contrast-based system to fill in the gaps at the sides for a total of 325 areas in a 25×13 array. In terms of exposure, you can manually set the aperture, shutter and ISO, and if desired, shoot with auto ISO when the shutter and aperture are fixed and effectively in manual mode. The X-H1 inherits the dual card slots and AF joystick of the X-T2, but adds a new AF-ON button as well as enlarging some of the buttons on the rear. I suspect some of the differences in performance are due to a combination of the focal length and the actual imaging circle delivered by that particular optical design. It would work sometimes, but not at others, and I found the experience quite frustrating when trying to capture Brighton’s seagulls. Reducing the speed to 5fps allowed the X-H1 to deliver live feedback though and made it much easier to follow the subject – this was useful for cycling, but a necessity for random birds in flight. Having three batteries certainly makes power worries a non-issue, but makes an already fairly large camera even bigger, not to mention more expensive. Fujifilm has extensively profiled all of its X-Mount lenses, and by default LMO is enabled on the X-H1 when you fit one of them. In Zone AF you can concentrate the autofocus to a square measuring 3×3, 5×5 or 7×7 points, and adjust its position using the AF joystick or cross keys; again if you’re in Single AF mode you can choose from the 91-point / 13×7 array, or in Continuous AF, the smaller 49-point / 7×7 array. I cannot believe that this camera exists… It is literally what I ever wanted in a body! I quite liked the Vertical Power Booster approach on the earlier X-T2, where you could effectively choose between a small and light body with some performance limitations, or a slightly larger one that unlocked the full power. Like that option, you can view thumbnails in two different sizes, tap to enlarge for a closer look and choose to import if desired. The X-H1 is fitted with Fujifilm’s X-Mount which, with the APS-C sensor behind it, applies a 1.5x field reduction factor to lenses – so the XF 16-55mm f2.8 zoom will deliver a field-of-view equivalent to 24-83mm. The X-H1 can film 4k video in UHD and now also the wider Cinema 4k formats (for clips up to 15 minutes in length), and 1080p is now available up to 120p for slow motion, and there’s also a new Eterna Film Simulation designed for a cinematic look out-of-camera, although you can alternatively record in 8-bit F-Log direct to the SD card. Switching to the longer primes for portraiture, like the XF 56mm f1.2 and XF 90mm f2, challenged the system more, but still generally performed well. Same for the shutter speed in Shutter Priority, or indeed either of them in Manual, but you can’t change the actual exposure mode remotely, nor can you effectively hold down the release button for Bulb exposures. Like all X-series bodies to date, the Fujifilm X-H1 doesn’t have an exposure mode dial; instead it adopts the same technique employed by older film SLRs for many years. Tap an icon on the right side of the screen and a tray pops-out, letting you adjust the shutter speed, aperture, compensation, sensitivity, microphone levels, wind filter, headphone volume, film simulation and white balance. In terms of continuous shooting, the X-H1 shares the same capabilities as the X-T2: a top burst speed of 8fps if you’re using the mechanical shutter, or 14fps if you switch to the electronic shutter. Like the X-E3 before it, the X-H1 also offers gesture controls. There’s many times I’ll have gone through a series of almost identical images on the camera in playback, then got completely lost when viewing them all as thumbnails on a remote control app – which was the one I liked best? Moving on, behind a weather-sealed door in the grip are twin SD memory card slots, both of which will exploit the speed of UHS-II cards, although as I discovered in my tests (see later), one was still a little slower than the other (but nowhere near as big a difference as on the Sonys). I can certainly live with vignetting or software correction for it, but am more concerned with softening in the corners. Above: Fujifilm X-H1 and XF 16-55mm at 55mm, 1/10. If you opt to ‘display window’, you’ll see a thin strip showing the camera model, shutter speed, aperture, ISO, compensation, white balance, and a small thumbnail of the latest picture taken. The X-H1 is typically sold body-alone or in a ‘kit’ bundled with the XF 16-55mm f2.8 zoom. Here’s two examples using the XF 16-55mm, one panning, the other walking.

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